Tag Archives: diet

The Perfect Diet

So here it goes.  A moment of truth…and shame.  Since I was about 15 years old I’ve been a chronic dieter.  And as a result, I’ve done a lot of damage to my body by depriving it of the essential healthy fats and other nutrients that it needed to be nourished.  And even worse, an imbalanced body like mine was utterly unable to support the healthy mind and spirit needed to really love myself.  The worst damage was done in the time leading up to my wedding when I began a 1000 calorie a day diet.  If I’d been just eating big bowls of vegetables and lightly steamed greens it might not even have been so bad, but I wasn’t.  I was incorporating the nutrition-less, empty calorie ‘diet’ foods like Weight Watchers meals and diet sodas.  And the awful thing, was that after 9 months of eating like this, depriving my body of any nourishment, I was exhausted, mentally and physically, and I wasn’t really losing that much weight.  I struggled to keep up my exercise routines because I had no energy.  I think I lost around 12 pounds in total.  I went to see a dietician at my local GP practice and her “sage” professional advice, after looking at my diet diary was to swap butter and olive oil for margarine and suggested that perhaps I should reduce my diet to 900 calories.  Yep, you heard it.  She wanted me to remove the small amount of healthy essential fat I actually WAS getting in my diet and replace it with toxic, hydrogenated, free-radical spread…I mean margarine.  Even I knew that was wrong, so I ignored her and continued with what I was doing.  It was only later, after the wedding and honeymoon, when I started thinking about wanting to become pregnant that things really changed and I realised the damage I had done to myself through deprivation dieting.

And now I’m ready to share with you the perfect diet.  Are you ready?  Here it is………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….there is no perfect diet.

There is a perfect diet for you, but there is no perfect diet that will work for all of us.  And here’s why.  It’s really complicated.  It’s because, get ready for it, we’re not the same person.  That’s right.  I’m not you and you’re not your neighbour John, or Sally who works at the supermarket.

Do I wish that we could all use the same diet and exercise formula and get the same results?  Yes, of course I do.  But genetics doesn’t work that way.  We each have different DNA (aside from identical twins, but even they express those genes in different ways) and so we don’t all have the same number of genes.  There is no perfect or ideal number of genes, so its not a competition.  But it does mean that some of us may lack enzymes which are essential for different body processes.  (Bear with me here, this will come back around to diet.)  You may have heard of the MTHFR, COMT or BRCA genes.  MTHFR and COMT enzymes are essential for methylation, which is used to control gene expression.  Women who lack these genes will have difficulty becoming pregnant and maintaining pregnancies.  On the other hand, the BRCA genes are tumour suppressing proteins and Angelina Jolie made the BRCA I & II genes famous when she had prophylactic surgery undertaken to remove her breast tissue, ovaries and fallopian tubes because of her high genetic risk for getting this cancer.  So what I’m getting at here, is that we don’t all process the world around us in the same way.  And we have to love our bodies for what they are.  The lack of this gene or that gene doesn’t make us imperfect, but it does make us realise that we may have to take certain precautions to avoid higher risks for foods, toxins and lifestyles which our bodies are simply unable to handle.  For me, the incorporation of a moderate amount of healthy, organic full fat dairy, like non-homogenised milk and raw butter, was incredibly important to feeling good again.

Okay, so I started eating healthfully again.  I got skinny right?  Wrong.  I started eating normally for like the first time in years, and my body had no. clue. what. to. do.  I mean I’d basically been telling my body – in prehistoric terms – that I was going through a time of famine and so when it started getting a normal amount of food, and I’m talking like 1500-1700 calories here, it thanked the god of rain for sending it a time of plenty and it decided to store every calorie it could.  As fat.  Yay.  But the good news was that all this healthy food I was now eating allowed me to maintain a really healthy pregnancy and produce a really healthy baby.

So a year and a half on postpartum, no I’m not skinny.  I’m not where I’d like to be, but I’m okay with how I look.  I fit into my size 8 jeans and that will do for the time being.  I’m still breastfeeding my daughter and I’m grateful to my body for all its been through and for the beautiful daughter its given me and still helps to nourish.  I continue to support my  thyroid health through diet and the use of therapeutic essential oils, and that is helping me enormously now.  So I guess what I’m saying is that I’ve very slowly found the diet that is right for me.  And actually, it isn’t a diet at all.  I’ve learned that I can’t eat too many sugars (argh!), one cup of coffee a day does me good (but more than that doesn’t) and that I am one of those people who can eat full fat dairy but that I definitely can’t process gluten (as much as I like to tell myself I can when I see a croissant winking at me from the bakery window).  However, for you, dairy may not be your friend.  Or you may not be able to tolerate coffee at all.  Some people have issues with one of their liver enzymes and can even build up high levels of mercury from eating something as simple as salmon, whereas the next person processes it perfectly well.  Juicing diets and green smoothies could actually do you a lot of damage if your thyroid isn’t functioning optimally.  And I haven’t even touched on how your gut flora fits in to all of this.  The list goes on.  Bodies are funny old things, aren’t they?

There is an easy and shorter – but more expensive – way to learn all of this about yourself.  You can get genetic testing done and enlist the help of a reputable nutritional therapist.  They can help you to understand your test results and to recommend bespoke  adjustments to your diet and lifestyle which will support what your individual body is able to do, and to avoid what it isn’t able to do.

I’m sorry that I wasn’t able to tell you that a Slim Fast shake is the perfect diet solution for you.  But its not.  Not for anyone.  And the one bit of generic advice I can give everyone is to get the toxic chemicals out of your food, cleaning and skincare regimens.  Eat organic, biodynamic or non-sprayed foods.  Use natural skincare.  Clean your home and office with natural cleaning products.  (They work just as well, by the way, and they cost less.)  Yes, we do have livers and yes, livers were designed to remove toxins from our bodies, but no one’s liver was designed to handle the amount of chemicals we eat, breathe and slather onto our skin every day in today’s world.

So whether you choose to go the slow route of figuring out the right diet for you, like I did (and continue to do), or if you opt for a faster route with the support of a nutritional therapist, I hope that above all you prioritise learning to love yourself and love your beautiful body.  I found the support of my Young Living essential oils incredibly helpful in both an emotional and physical capacity over the last 9 months of this process.  But I guess what I’m saying is be gentle with yourself, be kind to yourself, eat beautiful foods and move in ways that make you happy.

The Lowdown on Goji Berry Juice

Goji berries.  Those little shrivelled orangey red berries you bought at the health food store that were disappointingly bland.  Remember them?  You bought them because of something about them being a superfood…but then they languished in the cupboard and they were thrown out after the expiration date.

Yes.  That was my experience anyway.

I really didn’t like them and proceeded to forget about them for the next six or seven years.

The Facts

Goji berries are also known as wolf berries and they originate in Tibet and China.  The best wolf berries come from the Ningxia Province of China.  They’re a member of the nightshade family, like tomatoes and aubergines, and they are considered a superfood because they are rich in antioxidants, as most berries are, and because of the generations-old traditional Chinese belief that eating them can lead to a long and healthy life.  As with most natural products, the big pharmaceutical companies don’t want to invest their money in researching inexpensive and easily available food products, and so the research which has been done on the health benefits of goji has been sparse and of poor quality so far.

However…here are some nutritional facts about the fruit and you can make your own conclusions about whether it is likely to offer some health benefits:

  • contains all the essential amino acids, which makes it unique amongst fruits
  • highest concentration of protein of any fruit
  • high in vitamin C
  • contains more carotenoids than any other food
  • contains 21 trace minerals
  • high in fibre
  • has 15 times more iron than spinach

In my internet travels, I found an online lecture which I took with a pinch of salt, as it was promoted by a particular brand of goji berry juice supplement, but unless they were out and out lying, the results were impressive.  The lecturer shared sample blood work results for their producBaseline Blood Samplet had done for an individual’s red blood cells.  First they showed the baseline blood sample of the individual.  The red blood cells were stacked and unhealthy with very little surface area.  The video doesn’t go into it, but I should explain that in cytology, stacked red blood cells are called ‘rouleau’ and this happens as a result of various types of physical and/or mental stress which sends electrical currents through the body, forcing the cells to change their charge and stick together.  In practical terms, this is what high blood pressure looks like.

The lecturer then showed the second blood sample taken from the same individual, only 15 Second Blood Sampleminutes after they had consumed 1oz their brand of goji berry juice supplement.  These red blood cells now appeared much healthier.  Again, the lecturer didn’t cover this, but in cytology these would be called ‘normocytes’ which are the red blood cells of a healthy person.  They have a dip in the middle, with lots of surface space to detox and they flow freely in the plasma because they are all negatively charged.

I then went to the NHS website to see what they said and they pretty well pooh pooh’d the benefits of the goji berry.  Not because they had any evidence that the goji berries did not do what the anecdotal evidence suggested, but because of the lack of solid scientific evidence in favour of them.   Unfortunately, without serious financial investment, such evidence is unlikely to be researched and conventional medical websites like the NHS will continue to sing the same tune.

However…when generations of a traditional culture have relied on a food for its health benefits…its usually for a good reason.  And there is an awful lot of anecdotal evidence as well as the evidence from the small number of studies mentioned above which suggest that regular consumption of goji berries can improve diabetes*, high blood pressure* and age related macular degeneration.    In particular, preliminary studies involving consumption of goji berry juice resulted in a feeling of well being and calmness, improved athletic performance and quality of sleep as well as weight loss.  So, I guess I’m willing to play that gamble for the small expense of a few goji berries every day.

The Problem

The problem is that goji berries and goji juice…well, they don’t taste very nice.

My Experience

I had heard so many positive things about a particular brand of goji berry juice, that I ordered a couple of bottles and about a month ago I started taking a 50ml shot of it daily first thing after waking in the morning.  At first it just tasted good and I didn’t notice anything special in how I felt.  But after about a week of taking it daily, I found my energy levels significantly improved.  I mean really really improved.  I went from a constant state of lethargy and “I can’t keep up with this toddler” to feeling absolutely rested during the day, perfectly able to keep up with whatever is new in the world of my toddler, and I never have that ‘shattered’ feeling I had all the time before.  I have so much energy.  And I’m not sure why, but also an uncharacteristically optimistic and positive outlook on life…which I guess I can just describe as an overall sensation of ‘wellness’.  Another result, which I was not at all expecting, but am nonetheless delighted by, is that I have lost about 10 pounds, despite no change in exercise or diet (aside from the addition of the goji juice).  And the product I purchased** tasted delicious as it was blended with other antioxidant juices and had a tad of stevia added for sweetness.

I suppose that after spending so many years being disappointed by so many supplements, vitamins, superfoods, eating trends and so on, in battling my general state of poor energy and fatigue, I’m a little surprised that I feel as good as I do just from one tiny glass of juice each morning.  But I do.  So I guess I should just be happy about that!

In Summary

I am seriously impressed by my experience with this goji berry juice and will continue taking it long term.

I did have some slight concerns about the fact that goji berries are grown in China, but the company that made the supplement I have been taking is very aware of issues of toxicity with foods coming from China and their berries come strictly from the Ningxia Province which is very remote and is separated from the rest of China by a desert.  In addition to this, they perform a metals test on every new batch of berries they receive. Goji berries from ANY other part of China are loaded with heavy metals, including mercury.

And, I’ll add that I also gave the dried berries themselves a second chance and made some goji berry muffins.  I’ve include a link to the video and recipe!  They were delicious!  (I don’t recommend making the sugar glaze as directed in the muffin recipe – they don’t need it.  You can also use regular flour in place of the einkorn flour, although Dove’s Farm does make an einkorn flour here in the UK, and the ‘Blue Agave’ just means agave syrup.  You could use honey instead.)

*If you are taking drugs for either of these conditions, or if you are taking a blood thinning medication such as warfarin, please discuss taking any goji berry supplement with your doctor first, as it could interact with these prescriptions.

**I bought this product at full price with my own money and have not been paid or otherwise compensated to review it.  The results I describe are honest and based on my own experiences using this product.  There are many goji berry products on the market, however, I cannot guarantee that they come from the Ningxia Province in China and are free of heavy metals.  If you are interested in knowing the product I used, please follow this link.  You can order it retail or set up your own wholesale account, in which case you may be asked for a ‘Sponsor or Enroller ID’.  I’d be very grateful if you used mine, which is #3514264 and they’ll send me some sort of referral thank you.

Disclaimer: This is not a sponsored post.  I bought the product referred to with my own money and my comments are based on my own research and experience.  The information presented on this website is for informational purposes only.  The results reported may not necessarily occur in all individuals.  Consult your physician, nutritionally oriented doctor, and/or chemist regarding any health problem and before using any supplements or before making any changes in prescribed medications.

Photo Credit: Healthyfig.com

Paleo Diet Review

At first glance, my friend Sarah and I couldn’t have more different diets to each other.  So when we found out that the the other had decided to try the high protein, high fat Paleo diet earlier this year for the month of January, we were equally surprised.  Sarah was surprised because she secretly wondered how the heck was I – a vegetarian – going to eat Paleo…and just what would I be eating?  And I was surprised because after 18 years of friendship, I’ve never seen Sarah go a day without eating sugar and dairy.  So, with some delay (I like to think as a period of reflection) we would like to share our stories and thoughts on the experience.

Sarah’s Story

At the beginning of January I sat down with my computer and a hand-drawn calendar and mapped out Paleo meals. And then my family of 5 followed the Paleo diet for one month. It was ambitious. I was hard. It was sometimes complicated. But was it worth it in the end?

Maybe?

As a stay-at-home mother of three boys (with ages ranging from “will eat anything that’s put in front of him” to “won’t eat it if it’s not peanut butter”), I struggle every day to ensure my kids are eating healthy food.  Mostly my approach is pretty basic.  I buy organic, local produce (when I can).  I use whole grains.  And I cook, every day.  But kids are kids.  And although some people have those children who will eat anything, I don’t.  So the idea to cut out whole food groups that my children will eat (pasta, bread, cheese) was something that I didn’t take on lightly.  Would my children starve?

They didn’t of course.  And neither did I.  Because by week three, I was cheating.  Well, I wasn’t cheating.  But the kids were.  Because you can’t tell a five year old that spaghetti squash is pasta (because it’s not).  And the baby, it turns out, really missed yoghurt.

It turns out that there are a lot of good things about the Paleo diet.  We ate a lot of vegetables.  We avoided refined sugars.  I tried baking with alternative flours, and have added some really good new recipes to my files.  We eat locally, sustainably raised meat anyway, so that wasn’t different.  But our meals did become more…protein focused.

But we did miss the foods that we love.  And that was sometimes hard (hence my caving and cooking the boys pasta because they really wanted it).  Like any diet that is quite restrictive, there were times when the diet wasn’t any fun. And at the end of the day, I’m not sure, for example, that legumes or dairy are really all that bad for you.

The intriguing thing about the Paleo Diet is that it seems logical. As humans, we evolved a certain way, to eat certain foods. So it makes sense that these are the foods we should be eating to be healthy.

But healthy eating, for me at least, isn’t about restriction.  It’s about ensuring that I and my family are eating the largest variety of foods possible – including carbs and glutens and legumes when appropriate.  The Paleo diet turned out not to be for me, but the discipline of really being conscious of my food choices was useful in “resetting” my meal planning, and getting me out of the post-holiday sugar-pasta-junk food rut.  Will I try it again?

Maybe?

But with so many food trends out there, maybe next January I’ll try “Vegan before Six.”

Kelly’s Story

Student Nutritionists go through something similar to first year med students – the med students tend to get a bit hypochondriac and nutrition students love to try out all the hype diets.  As a responsible nutritionist, I will someday know that everybody and their body is different and will suit a different diet.  Some people do better with high fat, high protein diets, others favour raw vegan lifestyles.  Others, like macrobiotics, and followers of Weston A Price favour a pretty balanced whole foods diet.  (No one flourishes on a standard diet of processed foods, though.  No one.)  However, until that responsible future nutritionist (me!) is qualified, I’m enjoying trying out all kinds of different diets and ways of eating; partly so I can see what suits me and partly so I can understand the challenges that my future clients might face when moving onto specialist diets for one reason or another.

Its pretty easy for me to try these things out, as my lifestyle is pretty flexible and I don’t have children.  However, I do have a husband.  But he’s easy, you know.  He’ll pretty much eat whatever I’m eating…

…but with a steak thrown on top.

So, back to Paleo.  I already knew that I had an intolerance to modern hybridised wheat (while seeming to do just fine on heritage wheats like emmer, kamut and spelt), so I wondered if taking all grains out of the equation might make me feel even better.  (I’m slightly extremist at times.)

I was pretty dubious about taking my beloved pulses out of my diet, but in the interests of the experiment, I did.  I was okay about eliminating sugar and terrified about eliminating most dairy.  As I don’t eat meat, but do eat fish, I substituted organic or wild fish for the pasture-fed organic meats.  Otherwise, it was pretty much the same.  I actually emailed the founder of the Paleo movement, Dr Loren Cordain, to ask about this and received a pretty frank reply that a life without meat was an unhealthy one.  Uh huh….so that was a nice start.

But I was assured by all the fancy-looking blogs I had read and high energy Bulletproof Diet TED talks I’d seen, that once on a high fat, high protein, low carb diet, I would immediately drop a ton of weight and become the happiest, healthiest and most energetic I had ever been.

As it happened, I had low energy all the time because my brain wasn’t getting the glucose it needed for me to get on with my very busy life, my mouth eternally tasted of grease from all the coconut oil, fish oils, avocados and grassfed butter I was eating and no to put too fine a point on it, I may as well have piped polyfilla into my digestive tract.

Oh, and I gained about 8 pounds.

So Paleo wasn’t for me.   (I mean, have you TRIED Bulletproof coffee???)

But it wasn’t all bad.  It gave me an opportunity to try out lots of recipes using different wholefood ingredients which was fun and educational.  A few (Paleo pancakes) have even continued on as firm household favourites.  It made me reconsider a lot of the health food store processed foods I still somewhat relied on and it weaned me away from dairy, to which I was completely addicted.  It was really nice in mid-winter to come home from the shops with nearly nothing packaged in a box or bottle – just fresh fruits and vegetables, nuts, seeds, eggs (oh God, so many eggs) and organic fish and meats.  And that’s what I’ve kept from the experience.

So a few months down the line, my food intake is a much more satisfying and balanced high complex carb, low fat, low-med protein diet and it suits me so much better.  I can eat all the fruits and veg I want, along with some legumes (I really missed those in January) and a bit of brown rice or wholegrain pasta.

Oh and yeah, I kept the coconut oil.  Just, um, its not in my coffee this time…

pescatarian paleo

Okay, like soooooo many others, I’ve jumped on the Paleo bandwagon this January.

But here in the UK the Paleo diet is not quite so much a ‘thing’ yet.  In fact, if I had a nickel for every blank look I’ve received when I’ve said I’m doing Paleo, well, I’d have a few nickels at least.  (But hey, I live in the UK, so what good are nickels to me?)

So, what IS the Paleo diet?  Well, its based on the premise that our guts haven’t really evolved much in the last 15,000 years so we’re really better off eating what our Paleolithic ancestors ate, including fish, grass-fed pasture-raised meats, eggs, vegetables & fruit, fungi, roots and nuts.  Things you can’t eat are grains, legumes, dairy, (white) potatoes, refined salts and sugars and processed oils.  (Processed oils?  Yeah, I know, all oils are processed.  I use common sense here:  pasture-fed butter, organic raw coconut oil and olive oil are the only cooking fats I keep in the house.  If I ate red meat, lard would be on that list as well.)  This way of eating isn’t just about weight loss.  Done properly, its helped a lot of people with autoimmune issues (Crohn’s, Coeliac, etc) and leaky gut, as well as people with inflammation issues caused by food intolerances they may not even have been aware of before.  

The thing is, I’m pescatarian.  I don’t eat red meat or poultry, but I do eat fish, so I can’t strictly be called a vegetarian or an omnivore.  So I contacted Dr Loren Cordain, an expert on the Paleo diet about whether I could adapt this diet as a pescatarian.  I received a fairly prompt and unhelpful response setting out that in no uncertain terms would they advocate not eating meat.  It threw me a little bit, but only for about 2 minutes until I thought about it logically.  Whats not to love about this way of eating and why did I need commercial validation to do it anyway?  My diet is now filled with brightly coloured vegetables and greenery, fresh organic fish, organic free-range eggs and healthy fats & nuts – lots of unprocessed foods.  All I have eliminated from my diet is a vast amount of sugar – by this I mean sugar in the form of bread, pasta and grains, not just refined sugar.  So, I say boooo to Dr Cordain and I’m just enjoying doing Paleo the way that works for me.

So, have I lost any weight with the diet?  Well, its only been 3 weeks and as I don’t have a functional set of scales, I honestly couldn’t tell you.  What I can say is that my stomach is much flatter, I feel overall much more toned and my energy levels are much higher than they were.

Have I cheated?  Well, yes.  I have.  Several times.  And I’m okay with that.  There have been a couple of mornings when I have really missed my oatmeal, cooked with coconut cream and sweetened with apple and raisins – so I made it.  I didn’t feel the worse for  having it.  I’ve also continued to have a bit of organic milk in my tea and the odd bit of sheep or goat milk cheese.  For me its not a competition about being ‘right’ – its a process of finding out what works best for my lifestyle and what makes me feel the healthiest.  I lived a low-fat lifestyle for years, but now my diet is full of plenty of healthy fats – yes, including some saturated fats – and as a result, I’m staying full throughout the day and my usual mid-afternoon hypoglycaemic episodes appear to have disappeared.

What do I eat?  You know, its much MUCH easier than I thought it would be.  For lunch I might pack a tupperware box filled with organic baby spinach, a small baked sweet potato with a tad of feta crumbled on top, a grated carrot salad with raisins, a small bag of nuts as a snack and a couple of pieces of fruit.  Or a half an avocado on a bed of quinoa with some greens on the side or cooked kale with a lemon wedge to squeeze over it all.  Because I work in an office, I tend to save eating fishy things for dinner at home or restaurants – at the moment I’m really into Alaskan wild salmon, though also am trying to eat more local sustainable fish and also sardines.   I’ve also found a fantastic recipe for cauliflower pizza that I have adapted by putting sheep feta in the crust and grating some St Helen’s hard goat cheese (a version of cheddar) on top.

Because I have a sweet tooth, I also sometimes make an um…healthy(ish) sundae for dessert.  To do this, I whiz up 1.5 frozen bananas in the food processor with a tablespoon of maple syrup.  If it needs more liquid to get creamy, add a tablespoon of coconut water or coconut milk.  That makes the ice ‘cream’, which is like the texture of soft serve.  To make the chocolate sauce, you’ll need to open a can of full fat coconut milk which has been in the fridge for at least 24 hours (I always keep a few in the fridge now – the coconut cream rises to the top of the can and hardens and delicious coconut water remains at the bottom of the can, so you can use both) and scoop a heaped tablespoon of the coconut cream  into a small saucepan.  On a low-med heat, melt the coconut cream and whisk in a couple of teaspoons of a dark cacao powder along with enough maple syrup or coconut sugar to sweeten.  It will make a thick, fudgey hot chocolate sauce to pour over your ice ‘cream’.  Delicious!

There are some wonderful bloggers out there who inspire me with a regular dose of Paleo friendly recipes for meals, packed lunches, cakes, cookies & muffins.  Here are my favourites!  (And please don’t knock the Mommy Bloggers – these women channel their energies into creating delicious food for their amazing websites and have a better grasp on social media than most FTSE500 companies!)

Against All Grain

Primal Palate

Coconut Mama

Elana’s Pantry

Nom Nom Paleo

The Paleo Mama

The Paleo Mom

Paleo Newbie

In general, I guess while there is a lot I’m enjoying about this way of eating, I’m a little cautious about cutting significant food groups from the diet and probably lean a bit more toward the Weston A Price dietary guidelines than strict Paleo, but we’ll see how it goes.  By my next post I may have eased off the Paleo thing a bit.  Its not everyone’s cup of tea, but rest assured there are some tasty recipes in the wings and more adventures of dining in London to come.

Where HAVE I Been?

I’m pretty sure its a cardinal sin to leave your blog for 2 1/2 months with not so much as a measly posting like:  ‘Here, I went to Pizza Express and took a photo of some gelato and dough balls.’  Actually, I think I may have described the actual first cardinal sin of food blogging there.  Ok, so the SECOND worst sin is to leave your blog for 2 1/2 months.  Like I have just done.  But I do have some pretty good reasons why I’ve been negligent, and here they are:

Reason 1.  I moved house.

L and I bought a new house – so we packed up all our wordly goods, crammed them into £200 worth of cardboard boxes (yes, they do cost that much) and then had Aussie Man and Van (who are actually Polish, not Aussie at all) come and pick up all our crap and move it into the new house.  Moving house is a stressful time for everyone – and I was worried about the effect it would have on our relationship when added to the pressure of planning our wedding (due to take place a mere 4 months later).  But it was great!  We discovered the ultimate equitable division of labour.  I packed all the stuff up, then went to work on the morning of our moving day.  L then supervised the move, and I didn’t have to put up with lugging boxes or getting frustrated about the moving men arriving late.  That evening after work, I went to Charlie-from-PR’s leaving do, and then caught the train home – the train!  I commute now! – and returned to our new house in Dulwich.

And THAT is how you do it.

Reason 2.  Sky.

Yes, Sky and their bad bad BAD service.  L and I had both used Sky for years.  We were good customers – they made lots of money from us – mostly from those Box Office films at £2.99 a pop and all the extra channels and international phone calls.  So why did it take them TWO MONTHS to install our home phone and broadband in our new house?  Our house in ZONE 2 OF CENTRAL LONDON?  Here’s a link to Sky.  Complain.  Tell them that they’re lazy and you’re thinking of suing them for damages from missing out on 2 1/2 months of one of the best blogs ever.  Or something like that.

Reason 3. Food.

Eating London is a foodie blog – go figure – and the thing about food blogs are that they involve food.  Writing about it.  Taking photos of it with clever depths of field and at nifty angles.  And usually, at some point, eating it.  When you’re on a crash diet (Don’t lecture me about starvation mode, blah blah blah – just don’t.  Not at this stage.) food doesn’t really come into the equation that much.  I mean, I could write about things like the crappy little tubs of Weight Watcher fromage frais and Kallo rice cakes I eat these days or I could have L take pictures of me cutting Nori into small squares, spraying them with low cal olive oil spray and holding them with tongs over a low heat flame to make 7 calorie seaweed crisps…but I don’t want to write about it.  And you don’t want to read about it.  (But if you’re going to try the seaweed thing, make sure you sprinkle a pinch of sea salt on the Nori after you spray it but before you toast it.)  And that’s not really what I’m about as a cook.  Or at least it IS what I’m about for the next couple of months.

That’s it.  Those are my reasons.  So unfortunately I can’t end this blog with the pregnancy bombshell that my favourite blogger ever did a couple of weeks ago when she wrote a similar post explaining a recent absence – (Keeping it real) Housewife.  (Did I mention she’s my maid of honour?  And we live on opposite sides of the Atlantic?  How’s that gonna work?)  But the good news is that I’ve got a new house.  I’ve got a phone and broadband.  And I’ll probably fit into my wedding dress.  (Look, I told you this wasn’t building up to much.)

So for the next couple of months, bear with me and pretend that you’re interested in my stories about the mysteriously high calorie content of blueberries, or of how yoga is my lifesaver in a world of urban stressors and about how much I love interval training (I hate it. I hate it so much, I can’t tell you).  But someday again, I promise, there will be butter…