Tag Archives: our little organic life

Green & Sustainable Style Edit – September 2016

I’m a bit late getting this month’s style edit out.  There are several reasons.  Life happens, stuff gets busy, and I turned one year older.  But here I am and I’m really happy with this month’s look.  It reflects my feelings about September.  Going back to work after a long summer holiday.  The return to more structured clothes and lady-like style.  And for me, it signals the return to school.  After a two year break to enjoy pregnancy and my daughter’s infancy, I am now returning to finish my studies in Naturopathic Nutritional Therapy.  Its a part time course, and I will be attending the classes and clinics on weekends, so my daughter will be with her father while I’m not around.  (They have all kinds of fun things planned without me.)

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While for many, the return to school can mean wearing comfy clothes, for me that can’t happen.  I will be starting to attend the student clinics this year (scary!) and we need to look professional when seeing clients.  Here are some pieces which really caught my eye this season from a few of my favourite green/eco clothing companies.  For my first look I’ve gone for a Breakfast at Tiffany’s inspired theme and have paired a simple pair of organic cotton tapered black Alba trousers from People Tree with a structured NIA wool and recycled fibre blend boucle top from Komodo.

This is also the first time I have featured Beyond Skin, the Brighton-based (Hove, actually) vegan shoe company.  I struggle with vegan leather alternatives sometimes because they often simply replace leather with non-biodegradable plastics and other environmentally unfriendly options.  But what I like about Beyond Skin is that they are both ethical and environmentally conscious.  They incorporate organic and ecologically sustainable materials wherever possible and their shoe components are sourced from Spain and Italy and then produced in Spain – so all within the EU.  At present, they do incorporate PU into their soles, but in time they aspire to phasing this out to create a shoe free from all non-recycled petroleum products.  But…yadda yadda yadda…they’re doing the best they can at the moment and they make gorgeous shoes which are worn by more glamorous movie stars than you can shake a stick at. (Natalie Portman wore exclusively Beyond Skin in her movie V for Vendetta.)   This month I’ve featured two versions of their Shelley flats – one in a faux suede and the other in a shiny faux leather.

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For my second look I’ve continued with my Audrey Hepburn inspiration and have brought together a Komodo TAIO bamboo jersey dress with a cotton Wrasse jacket from Cornish designer, Seasalt.  I’ve accessorised it with a very simple vintage silk Hermes scarf in a bright autumn colour.

3093For perfume, I’ve been wearing my favourite essential oil of the moment, Idaho Blue Spruce.  I added a rollerball to the top of the bottle and roll it along the top of my spine and along the tops of my tension-ridden shoulders.  I find it an incredibly comforting smell and with all the uncertainty I’m experiencing with preparing for my return to school, comfort is what I need right now.  (Better than finding comfort in a plate of macaroni cheese, right?)  Idaho Blue Spruce is meant to bring a sense of balance, to release emotional blocks and clear emotional trauma.

What about you…what are you wearing this season now that there’s a slight chill in the air?

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What’s The Best Natural Pillow?

When you think that we spend a third of our life sleeping, furnishing our bed shouldn’t be an afterthought.  It should actually be a place where we invest in quality.  Unfortunately most pillows and mattresses are covered in serious amounts of toxic flame retardant (filled with hormone disruptors) and formaldehyde.  And as if that isn’t bad enough, no matter how much chemical they slather onto our pillows, that doesn’t prevent them from immediately starting to accumulate fungi, dead skin cells, dust mites, their carcasses and their faeces.  In fact, over time (as little as 18 months), up to 1/2 of the weight of your pillow can be attributed to this delightful cocktail.  So yeah…I wash my pillows pretty frequently.

Over the years I’ve slept on pretty much every kind of pillow going and before I go into why I have settled on my pillow of choice, let me run through the pros and cons of the other pillows I have used (and a couple which I haven’t).

Synthetic Pillows

In my first apartment I had the artificial polyester hollow fibre pillows.  They can be inexpensive, but they don’t last particularly well, as they go flat quickly and when you throw them into the washing machine to clean them, they separate and clump up.  Even a trip through the tumble dryer doesn’t quite put them back to rights, and these misshapen, unsupportive pillows can cause neck pain.  They generally have a life span of about 6 months but should never be kept longer than 2 years.  So you can start to see how investing in a good pillow can make a difference.  I’ve also tried memory foam pillows which I personally found to be awful.  They sound fancy, but they’re just made from polyurethane with other added chemicals.  They gave both of us aching necks (when they were supposed to ease them!) and the smell of them gave us headaches.  They also don’t ventilate well and they can make you sweat quite a lot.  They quickly made it on to the guest bed of unwanted pillows.  Not money well spent.

Feather Pillows

I’m not a fan of feather pillows.  Like the synthetic pillows they can go clumpy (even more so) and I find that the sharp bases of the feather soon start to poke through the pillow, making the pillow a bit spiky and cactus-like.  I also have allergies so I find these pillows exacerbate this problem.  And then there is the issue of the ethics of these pillows.  The feathers often come from birds kept in terrible living conditions which are then plucked alive.  I know John Lewis department store has expectations of animal welfare for the birds which are plucked to fill the feather and down bedding they sell.  In other words, these feathers are by-products of the food industry.  Either way, its not pretty.  Personally I have not found an ethically satisfactory source for feather pillows so I would not recommend them from a comfort, care or ethical standpoint.  However, my husband came with a set of these nasty pillows included…so if you are ever staying in our guest room, all I can say is sorry.

Down Pillows

Now while down feather pillows may face the exact same ethical issues as feather pillows do, they are made from the soft, under-feathers of some types of birds – usually ducks and geese – and they are extremely, deliciously comfortable.  They’re also quite expensive, so you’ve got to watch out for companies selling pillows which are a blend of down and feather.  They’re a long lasting pillow and you can wash them in the washing machine, so long as you don’t try to air dry them.  They WILL MILDEW inside the pillow if you try to air dry them, so be sure to tumble dry them until they are beyond bone dry.  They will once again become fluffy and plump after this process.  My husband uses down pillows on his side of the bed, and I find them easy to care for.  I have not found an entirely ethically satisfactory source for down pillows or duvets, so I make sure I look after the ones we already have very well with regular washing, airing and maintenance.  (See Kapok Pillows below for a great vegan-friendly alternative).

Wool Pillows

Okay, I love wool pillows.  Its incredibly easy to source organic wool pillows and duvets which are locally and ethically made here in the UK as well as in Canada and the US, and they are so comfortable and soft.  I know vegans aren’t too happy about wool, but the fact is that modern sheep breeds need to be sheared, so as long as its a nice organic farm where they love their sheep, I’m okay with that.   Wool pillows don’t go clumpy or lumpy and they don’t go flat.  They’re naturally hypoallergenic, they deter dust mites and wool is a very breathable material.  They’re also super easy to throw in the washing machine on a regular basis too.

Buckwheat, Millet & Spelt Pillows

I have to admit I haven’t tried these, but they may be worth investigating if you like a really firm pillow.  I’m assuming that anyone with coeliac disease or a severe gluten intolerance should probably avoid the spelt pillow and opt for the millet or buckwheat instead, as they are gluten-free fillings.  The millet is smaller and more sand-like, whereas the spelt husks are bigger and have a more massage-like effect on the body.  They also have a high silica content and are considered to help prevent muscle aches and pains.  The buckwheat pillows are robust and supportive while still being light and airy.  They are a great option for anyone who tends to sweat up a storm at night, as they allow moisture and heat to evaporate quickly.

Natural Latex Pillows

I have also not tried natural latex  filled pillows, but they offer a firm support and are a bit bouncy.  They’re also good for people who suffer from dust allergies because they cannot support the growth of bacteria, germs and moulds.  They’re not for people with chemical sensitivities though (lots of people have latex allergies), and some people can detect a slight smell of latex the first few times they use the pillows.

Horsehair Pillows

I’m just gonna say it.  I don’t see myself sleeping on a pillow filled with Black Beauty’s tail.  I don’t care how ethical the sourcing is.  But the advantages to a horsehair pillow are that they provide a medium firm support and are another great one for anyone who gets the night sweats, as they regulate moisture well.  They are warm and dry and the horsehair is said to have anti-rheumatic qualities.

Kapok Pillows

So I’ve saved my absolute favourite for last.  These pillows are incredibly luxurious. If you didn’t know you were sleeping on Kapok you’d swear you were sleeping on the softest down pillow ever.  And its vegan friendly, so if you don’t use animal based fibres in your home, then kapok means that you don’t need to resort to using synthetic fibres. So what the heck is kapok?  Well its a sort of silky fluff which comes from a tree which grows wild in tropical forests.  So while they’re not ‘grown organically’ there’s never any pesticides on them.  These trees are an important part of local economies and therefore are always very well looked after.  The kapok fibre itself contains naturally bitter compounds and that makes it really unattractive to dust mites and other creepy crawlies in general (that was a win for me!) and the fibres are also covered in a sort of wax which cannot absorb or retain moisture, so your  kapok pillow or duvet will always be dry, no matter how damp the weather outside.  Kapok pillows can be washed and tumble dried, but what I love about the one I have is that the organic cotton quilted cover and inner cover can be unzipped, and the soft, downy kapok filling removed while the fabric is being washed.  So if you only want to fluff and ‘air out’ your kapok filling from time to time, its much easier to do so.

OLOL Kapok Pillow

Conclusion

So whatever pillow you opt for, try to find one which provides the right level of support for you, one that is easy to clean on a regular basis (remember the mite faeces & carcasses I mentioned earlier?) and which comes from ethical and environmentally sustainable materials.  Remember that you and your partner don’t necessary need to have the same pillow – one of you might benefit from a firm buckwheat pillow, while the other luxuriates on the softness of kapok.  Personally I love supporting small, local producers and manufacturers.  My organic wool and kapok pillows are simply the best pillows I have ever had.  I can’t remember where my wool pillows from Canada were bought now (somewhere in Canada, obviously!), but the kapok pillows came from Greenfibres, a shop based down in Devon which also produces organic wool, buckwheat, spelt, natural latex and horsehair pillows in the same nifty design where you can remove the filling for airing, cleaning and to adjust the height and density of the pillow.  I’m just going to big up this shop a bit because they were incredibly helpful in talking me through the process of finding a new pillow – in fact I’d have never known about kapok pillows if it weren’t for them – and they’re on Etsy as well, so if you can’t find a local supplier in your own country, you can order them internationally as well.

And because I care about you guys and I really  hate the thought of you sleeping on dust mite poop, I’d also like to share with you this great, short video from Clean My Space which I discovered during the ‘nesting phase’ of my pregnancy and its where I learned how to clean and maintain my pillows and duvets:

Green & Sustainable Style Edit – July 2016

This month I’ve pulled together a sophisticated, but bright and summery capsule wardrobe featuring clothing from eco clothing brand, Komodo.

I’ve paired up a black SENS t-shirt made from 100% bamboo with a pair of lightweight, sulphur coloured ADAM tencel linen shorts.  In case you’ve not heard of tencel, its a very sustainable fabric made from wood cellulose, and is one of the most environmentally friendly fabrics on the market.  I’ve also opted for this 100% organic cotton gathered tie dress  in black from People Tree for more formal occasions and to take the look into the evening.

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Both looks go equally well with the accessories I’ve chosen.  I know there are plenty of 443512-290be77a2dd24ddeb0bb7aeb43bc27adother eco-brands of shoes on the market now which probably have better eco credentials, but I’ve been wearing Birkenstocks since I was about 15 and I’m not going to stop now.  I always make sure I get the most out of each pair by caring for them well and getting them resoled as needed.  These gold crackle effect sandals look great paired with a cork & gold oversized clutch from Etsy and this simple gold layered necklace from Komodo or a pair of Brazilian paxiubinha seed earrings from LauraBijoux.  With 20 years of jewellery design experience, Brazilian expat Laura Torster now lives in Portugal and she ships her eco creations worldwide.  She’s also very happy to work with you to create something bespoke for you and at the moment I’ve commissioned her to create a pair the same earrings pictured above for me, but with a spring loaded loop, as I am one of those rare individuals without pierced ears.

OLOL Style Edit Accessories

When it comes to sunglasses, I’ve always slightly struggled with the eco options.  They’re often made from bamboo and are probably great if you have one of those faces that looks good wearing classic RayBan wayfarers.  But I don’t have one of those faces.  And I was so happy to find these stylish and feminine black & honey MARINO sunglasses from Antonio Verde, made from recycled plastic and bamboo.

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I always would encourage anyone to shop sustainably by going to charity shops and second hand clothing stores, however sometimes its hard to get specific pieces you might need when shopping this way, and so I want to share these style updates as a regular, up to date resource guide for you to find out what is out there in the eco fashion world.  I have done style edits in the past, but as I’ve started to research and connect with all the wonderful companies out there producing green and sustainable fashion, I want to get a chance to feature as many as I can. In particular, UK-based companies. There has been a great response from nearly everyone I’ve approached so far.

I have not been compensated (financially or in kind) for featuring any of the brands listed in this style edit.  I just genuinely like them. Komodo have, however, been kind enough to provide me with some lovely high res images to use in this feature and they’ve also tipped me off with some insider information that their summer sale is due to start later this week on their website: www.komodo.co.uk.

I hope this inspires to you to check out some of these eco brands when you’re updating your wardrobe this summer.

Real Food Organic Groceries on a Budget

We’re a family of 3 living on a single income and that’s not always easy when you don’t eat processed or GMO foods and try to buy mostly organic.  But, you know, it can be done.

I do a video each month on my YouTube channel showing what I’ve received in my real food organic grocery order (and yes…the odd pizza might sneak its way in there!).  My grocery order has to accommodate myself (pescatarian and mostly gluten-free), my husband (full on meat eater) and our baby (can’t decide what she likes/doesn’t like from one week to the next!) as well as our dog.

We budget around £45-£75 per week (depending on whether its a ‘big shop’ or not) and I’ll let you know how we do it in 3 easy ways.

1. Meal Planning

This is the most important thing I do to save money and still buy the food I want to buy for my family.  There are many ways to meal plan.  There are meal planning services you can use for only a few dollars/pounds a month and this is great when you’re short on time.  If you can find 15 spare minutes per week though, you don’t need to use a service.  I’ll tell you how I do it.  I have a Pinterest account and keep a folder of favourite family meals that are tried and true.  If I’m short on time, I’ll choose 5 or 6 at random, check the ingredients list and add the required items to my grocery list.

2. Online Shopping

This isn’t an option for everyone, as not all areas offer online shopping, but if you are able to do this, I highly recommend it as it helps in avoiding making any ‘impulse buys’.  I just go online, stick to my list and check out.  A lot of grocery stores have delivery plans which are just a few £££’s a month you can do unlimited grocery orders without additional delivery charges.  I find I’m able to get the best variety of real food products and organic groceries at Ocado and if you’re a new customer, they’ll offer you £20 off your first online grocery shop (if you click here).

3. CSA (Community Supported Agriculture) Box or Organic Delivery Box

Many rural areas run CSA schemes which support local farmers and are great value.  You will have to meal plan according to what’s in your box – so sort of reverse meal planning.  There are also non CSA style organic delivery boxes here in the UK such as Abel & Cole and Riverford Organics.  I get my organic fruit, veg & salad box with my Ocado order from a company called Wholegood.  Their fruit and veg are really good quality and they’re very generous with the volume of produce in their boxes.  They also let you know what you’ll be receiving in your box a couple of weeks in advance, which is helpful for meal planning.